WeatherNation Blog

Where is the cold? – Part II

Well, if you checked out our blog yesterday we gave you some images of temperatures as of early in the morning across Alaska and Canada, along with the rest of the North American continent.  Well, how about we take a look back at some of the cold we ended up seeing as we got some official temperatures coming in yesterday:

FORT YUKON CO-OP OBSERVER…………..63 BELOW

HUSLIA……………………………63 BELOW

TANANA……………………………61 BELOW

BETTLES…………………..………60 BELOW

FORT YUKON AIRPORT…………………58 BELOW

GALENA……………………………58 BELOW

MANLEY HOT SPRINGS…………………58 BELOW

COLDFOOT………………….………57 BELOW

WOODSMOKE SUBDIVISION – NORTH POLE…..57 BELOW

KALTAG……………………………56 BELOW

MCGRATH…………………..………54 BELOW

CIRCLE HOT SPRINGS…………………53 BELOW

NENANA……………………………53 BELOW

SHUNGNAK………………….………51 BELOW

FAIRBANKS AIRPORT………………….50 BELOW

DELTA JUNCTION………………….…49 BELOW

DENALI NATIONAL PARK……………….49 BELOW

 

Now, we certainly know where the cold was yesterday!  The big question now?  Where was the warmth?  Well… check out these highs we saw yesterday in California, which ended up being records or tying records:

Fullerton at 83… old (75/2009)

John Wayne Airport at 82… old (73/2011)

Ontario at 78… old (78/2011)

Oceanside at 76… old (74/2011)

How about some quick temperature contrasts, as compared to Fort Yukon vs. Fullerton’s record high from yesterday: a 146 degree difference! 

Have a great Sunday and enjoy whatever temperatures you’re seeing!

Where is the cold?

It’s been a common question so far on the winter, but once again we find ourselves asking this all-too-common question in the winter of 2011-2012:  Where on EARTH is the cold?

As many of us continue to see well above average temperatures, with maybe a brief cooldown and snowstorm every now and then, there ARE some areas of the northern hemisphere that are seeing cold temperatures.

One of those areas is Alaska and sections of Canada, into Greenland as well:

 

You can see quite a bit of cold weather up there!

The key temperature that sticks out to me, and likely to you as well, is the -56° temperature seen in northeastern Alaska as of early on this morning.  That is intense cold! Areas of Minnesota and other “typical cold spots” in the Midwest and the Northeast, in the meantime, saw low temperatures on the morning that were only slightly below what an average *high* temperature would be (Minneapolis cooled to the upper teens, with an average high in the middle 20s).

What will likely happen, as has been the trend this winter, will be a pooling of cold, dense air back over Canada – with an eventual breakage.  When will that happen?  Well there are no sure bets on when the next cooldown will take place, but there are some signs in the extended – not to mention we all know that in winter it should be cold!

Enjoy the warmth for this time of year and get outside if you can!

Shrinking Drought Areas

Texas Drought

Huge amounts of rain in a short amount of time have left portions of Texas dealing with flooding situations over the past few days.   In recent months and even years drought is a word that is more often associated with Texas than flood.  Let’s check in to see where we are with the latest drought statistics coming out of Texas:

Palmer Drought Index

This images shows the amount of rain needed to end the drought.  Recent storms brought a huge amount of rain to the Dallas Area.  In those areas, not much additional rainfall is needed to end the drought conditions, while the Houston area and surrounding Gulf coast is still needing more rain.

Expect another mild and dry today across Texas with no rain for the upcoming weekend.  Temperatures will be significantly cooler tomorrow after a front moves through tonight.

The only other areas of the nation classified to be under exceptional drought conditions are a few pockets in the Southeast.

Back in November just over 9% over the country was classified “Exceptional” drought and now only 2.29% of the nation is in that category.

Forecast For Today

Looking at the bigger picture, all the active weather is much further northeast.  Maine could receive up to 10 inches today while the northern tier of the midwest also picks up a few quick inches as another system zooms through.