WeatherNation Blog

Superstorm Sandy Winds Down; Slowly Getting Back to Normal

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Thanks to Lyle Ostrow, for sharing this picture of a carved “Frankenstorm” pumpkin. That is one of the more creative pumpkin I’ve ever seen!

Superstorm Sandy: By the Numbers

By The Associated Press

Hurricane Sandy, after killing at least 69 people in the Caribbean, streamed northward, merged with two wintry weather systems and socked the Northeast, mid-Atlantic and Great Lakes with wind, waves, rain and snow. Some figures associated with Sandy’s rampage through the U.S., as of Tuesday evening:

— Maximum size of storm: 1,000 miles across

— Highest storm surge: 13.88 feet, at New York

— Number of states seeing intense effects of the storm: At least 17

— Deaths: At least 55

— Damage: Estimated property losses at $20 billion, ranking the storm among the most expensive U.S. disasters

— Top wind gust on land in the U.S.: 140 mph, at Mount Washington, N.H.

— Power outages at peak: More than 8.5 million

— Canceled airline flights: More than 18,100

— Most rainfall: 12.55 inches, at Easton, Md.

— Most snow: 29 inches, at Redhouse, Md.

— Evacuation zone: Included communities in more than 400 miles of coastline from Ocean City, Md., to Dartmouth, Mass.

Read more HERE:

(Photo Below Courtesy: NASA Satellite)

Updates of Flights

Superstorm Sandy really snarled up air travel. According to Flightaware.com there have been nearly 20,000 flights cancelled across the U.S. this week. Most of those cancelled flights have been from LaGuardia, Neward, JFK, Reagan National and

LaGuardia Near 4,000 Flight Cancellations

Thanks to @JetBlue for the picture below. Not sure that the blue thing is a new dock invention… it’s actually the terminal gate to the tarmac! It looks like a lake out there.

Read more on the flight cancellations from LATimes.com HERE:

Limited Subway Service to Resume Thursday

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Wednesday that the MTA would begin resuming limited service on both Long Island Railroad and Metro-North beginning Wednesday at 2PM. Limited subway service will be restored to 14 of the system’s 23 lines on Thursday. In Manhattan ,service will only be available above 34th Street, with services in Lower Manhattan suspended indefinitely due to flooding and power outages.”

Read more from huffingtonpost.com HERE:

(photo below courtesy: NYGovCuomo)

Back to Business: New York Getting Back on it’s Feet

The New York Stock Exchange will be open Wednesday, while JFK and Newark Airports resume limited service. Still, getting all of the city’s power back on could take days. (Oct. 31)

See the Video HERE:

Bloomberg Rings NYSE Bell

NEW YORK — Mayor Michael Bloomberg has rung Wall Street back to business. Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of Hurricane Sandy. Bloomberg rang the opening bell at 9:30 a.m., right on schedule, as stock traders cheered from the iconic trading floor below, falsely rumored to be flooded, but dry Wednesday morning, and festive.”

Read more HERE:

(Photo Courtesy: Dario Cantatore/NYSE Euronext/REUTERS)

Intense Winds & Waves

This Superstorm also kicked up significant winds across the Great Lakes! I recorded a little video segment explaining how the wind/waves got so big!

See the full video HERE:


Incredible Snows

The western and colder side of this storm dumped feet of snow across the higher elevations of the Appalachians.Thanks to Snowshoe Mountain for the picture below

This is what they had to say about the snow:

“Over 2ft. and Counting”

Sorry for the lack of posts today, but as you can imagine with over 2 feet of snow in the past day and a half we have been dealing with power outages as well as phone and internet issues here at 4848. We know the big question on everyone’s mind is, “When is Snowshoe going to open, Is Snowshoe going to open on Wednesday?!” To answer the second half of the question first… No Snowshoe will NOT be opening Wednesday. As far as the first part of the question… We will be answering that tomorrow so stay tuned and find out! In the meantime here is some video from today to help pass the time between now and then…”

See the full video HERE:

No Stranger to Snow in MinneSnowta…

I’ll never forget that Halloween back in 1991. I was still young enough to trick-or-treat and actually went as a cow that year! Good think I had black spots so you could see me in the white snow.

Check out this story from the Startribune.com that was written last year:

Indeed, the great Halloween Blizzard stands as one of those rare events that achieve I-remember-what-I-was-doing status, a milepost in a few million Minnesotans’ personal histories and an occurrence that can still define life in Minnesota as, well, different. “Climbing over and through the drifts was exhausting,” recalled Amber Langley of Lakeville, who was in second grade at the time and made the Halloween rounds dressed as a witch. “In my neighborhood hardly anyone was out, and the neighbors were dumping whatever candy they had into my sack so they could shut their light off. I don’t think that Halloween is ever going to fade from my memory. It was beyond insane. “

(Photo Courtesy: Startribune)

Halloween Blizzard TV Coverage!

OMG! This is like gold to me! This is what I watched when I was a young, budding meteorologist. Watching Paul Douglas cover this historic storm was something that I’ll never forger!

See the full video HERE from TCMediaNow.com

Historic Event 21 Years Ago

The info below come from umn.edu, see more HERE:

Across much of eastern Minnesota, trick-or-treaters donned snowmobile suits as snow began to fall during the afternoon of October 31, 1991. This marked the beginning of a major winter storm that pounded the eastern half of Minnesota over a three day period. The storm dropped 28.4 inches of snow on the Twin Cities, setting a single storm record for the metropolitan area. Duluth received 36.9 inches, the largest single storm total in Minnesota history. Southern Minnesota saw an ice storm especially around Albert Lea and Austin. Highway snow removal was hindered by extremely cold temperatures that followed the storm and transportation was hampered for many days. Click on image to the right for a larger labeled line map.

Thanks for checking in on this Wednesday, have a great rest of your week!

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV

Blizzards Hit the Appalachians

Blizzards Hit the Appalachians

Sandy is no longer a hurricane, but its remnants continue to spin over the eastern U.S., wreaking havoc in the mountains of West Virginia. Some locations tallied 30-40 inches of snow by Tuesday afternoon, shown below in the 2 PM snow depth analysis from the National Weather Service. That’s over THREE FEET of snow!

The Associated Press reports from Elkins, WV, where heavy snow made for disastrous driving conditions and knocked out power to nearly 268,000 customers. Click the link below for video.

Sandy Leaves Blizzard Conditions in W. Va.

Snow removal progress via West Virginia DOT, valid 2AM Wednesday (map generated here: http://gis.wvdot.com/sric/index.html) is below.

Nearly 50 miles of Interstate 68 closed down during the storm due to the blinding, heavy snow. There were reports of many stranded vehicles, including multiple jack-knifed semi-trucks.

CHEAT LAKE, W.Va. -– Authorities closed nearly 50 miles of Interstate 68 on either side of the West Virginia-Maryland state line Tuesday because of blizzard conditions and stuck vehicles. Courtesy of Hurricane Sandy, traffic coming from the Mon/Fayette Expressway in Pennsylvania was stopped near the interchange with I-68 or diverted west toward Morgantown, W.Va. …Police said the westbound lane of I-68 was opened Tuesday afternoon, but the eastbound lane remains closed until weather conditions improve. …I-68 crosses through Preston County, W.Va., and Garrett County, Md., where heavy snowfall and blizzard conditions are common. Read more here: http://www.ellwoodcityledger.com/news/local_news/blizzard-shuts-down-miles-of-interstate/article_7582f2e3-5711-5ddf-b64b-059db7253843.html

While some roads have been cleared, there is still more snow to come. The Hydrometeorological Prediction Center is forecasting that higher elevations of West Virginia could be in for as much as twelve more inches of snow by Wednesday evening. These maps show the probability of an additional 4, 8, and 12 inches of snow respectively.

Here’s a closer look at the forecasted snow totals for West Virginia. These are 6-hour accumulation forecasts via the National Weather Service:

Blizzard Warnings and Winter Storm Warnings will remain in effect through the afternoon Wednesday for the northern Appalachians. By Wednesday evening, precipitation should gradually become rain/snow (wintry) mix. Wind speeds will be on the decrease as well as Sandy’s remnant low loses its strength.

 

As the Sandy-hybrid winds down, we look to the horizon for the next weather-making system. We don’t have to look far, as another area of low pressure is set to form in the Pacific Northwest and skirt its way through the Midwest this weekend, bringing a chance for some snow into northern Minnesota, and rain to the Central Plains. Here’s the surface maps from HPC:

Stay tuned to WeatherNation TV for more on this next weather system, and updates on the recovery after Sandy.

Meteorologist Miranda Hilgers

Superstorm Sandy: Unprecedented Impacts, Early Estimated Losses Near $45 BILLION

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

This has been an unreal storm so far and it continues to batter the Northeast today. Weather conditions won’t be as bad as they were yesterday across the East Coast, but heavy rain, wind and snow will continue for many spots as the storms nearly stalls inland.

Size of Sandy – IMMENSE!

Take a look at these screen captures that we made at the office on Tuesday. We tried to put into perspective the overall immensity of the storm as it sat on the eastern half of the country on Tuesday.

Satellite of Sandy on Tuesday

WOW… what a storm, eh? This reminds me a lot of the satellite picture of the storm in the movie “Day After Tomorrow”. We don’t have the satellite data of the northern side of the storm here, but let’s just say that the cloud shield from the Superstorm stretched from the Hudson Bay to the Gulf Coast States. The comparison to that is in the following images below.

Size Marker #1

Size Marker #2

Size Marker #3

In this image, we can really see how large this system really is. That’s approximately the distance from just north of International Falls, MN to just north of Brownsville, TX… A quick Google mapping driving distance to those places showed an approximate distance of 1,800 miles.

Superstorm Sandy’s Significant Impacts

Here are just a few of the major headlines that we were able to pick up… there are many more and likely many to come.

*The Landfall occurred near Atlantic City, NJ aroun 8pm Monday with 80mph. This was the worst case scenario for New York as it was on the “Right Front Quadrant” of the storm. This allowed hurricane for winds to pile up water in those areas. The storm surge growing to over 10ft. in many locations, worse than previously thought.

*The central pressure of the storm was that of 944mb as it made landfall, which makes it the strongest storm of an Atlantic Basin storm north of Cape Hatteras, NC! The information below was from our very own Bryan Karrick.

The Great Hurricane of Sept. 1938, also known as the “Long Island Express,” had the lowest pressure of an Atlantic Basin storm north of Cape Hatteras, NC at 946 mb. Hurricane Sandy broke a record Monday, the central pressure dropped to 940 mb! She made landfall with a pressure at 944mb, with a tropical storm wind field close to 1000 miles across. As our own Addison Green says, “It’s like flying from NYC to Tampa, FL!”

*There was a record crest at the Battery in New York. Water levels rose to 13.88ft. overnight, which broke the previous record of 11.2ft. set in 1821.

*The estimates of power outages in the graphic below were from earlier Tuesday. That number will certainly fluctuate significantly over time… There were reports by midday Tuesday of nearly 7 million without power.

Fatalities Associated With Sandy

We continue to hear about additional deaths with the Superstorm, most by falling trees. Unfortunately, I think there will be more…

Read more from KnoxNews.com HERE:

NEW YORK — Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without electricity, and an eerily quiet New York City was all but closed off by car, train and air as superstorm Sandy steamed inland, still delivering punishing wind and rain. The U.S. death toll climbed to 35, many of the victims killed by falling trees.”

Other Significant Impacts

Massive flooding has over taken parts of the city, especially in Lower Manhattan around Ground Zero. There were also reports of subway stations filling up with water!

(Photo Courtesy: New Jersey PATH Subway System)

(Photo Below Courtesy: National Hurricane Updates)

New York AP photo, tons of yellow taxis submerged in Hoboken


Photo of the Plaza Shops in NYC

Flooding in Linden, NJ

Massive Power Outages

Take a look at this video out of New York City. That’s an explosion at a Con Ed plant! Con Edison is the power company out there.

See full video HERE:

Power Failure Map

This is a interesting map (check the loop here) – it shows the number of power failures throughout the evening.

More than six million customers lost power Monday as Hurricane Sandy felled trees, downed power lines and flooded substations. The storm led to power failures in at least 17 states, including more than a million customers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and about 660,000 in New York City. Roughly a quarter million customers lost power in Manhattan alone after a fiery explosion at a substation on East 14th Street, leaving nearly the entire island eerily dark south of 34th Street. Con Edison officials called the power failures “the largest storm related outage in our history.” Officials said they expected to be able to restore electricity to much of Manhattan before the night was over but that it could be a week before all service was restored.”

New York Faces Big Problems!

Here are two quotes that really put into perspective the size and magnitude of the situation.

Early Estimated Losses From Sandy…

Some of the early estimates suggests that the estimated losses from the storm (this number is frightening) could total $45 BILLION dollars!

More from ABCNews.com HERE:

Late Night in New York

I thought this was interesting… Jimmy Fallon, late night talk show host sent his audience home before the show started/the storm hit and for good reason. However, Jimmy still did the show! Watch his opening monologue, audience free HERE:

Major Wind Gusts

Take a look a few of the higher wind gusts reported across the area yesterday. The highest on the list compiled by the NWS was a 94mph report Eatons Neck, NY. There was another notable report from the Islip Airport at 90mph

Mount Washington Observatory

There were even stronger wind gust reports coming from Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire (elevation 6,288ft.). There were several gusts over 100mph, but the strongest report was 140mph!

See more HERE:

The official wind chart for October 29, 2012 – peak gust of 140 mph (139.7 mph to be specific)! This is the 24 hour Hays (wind speed recording device) chart with average wind direction and speeds recorded around the edge of the chart. Midnight is at the top then it goes hourly counterclockwise. The peak is marked by the triangle. Time, speed in KTS, and gust direction are in the center. FYI – this is the strongest recorded gust since March 21, 2008 when 145 mph was measured. Additional Max, Min, Avg weather data for yesterday (and all of October) can be viewed here: http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/f6/2012/10.pdf”

Massive Snows in the Appalachians!

Thanks to Beau Dodson for this picture out of Davis, WV! That’s insane and one massive dumping of snow in the Appalachians. The snow will be measured in feet!

See more of Beau’s pictures HERE:

“There is a car under the snow – this is a side street. This is about 2 blocks east of the main street here in Davis, West Virginia – the downtown street.”

I could honestly keep going with information… there is SO much! Thanks for checking in on this Tuesday, have a great rest of your week. We’ll have more tomorrow!

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV

Sandy: A Record Setting Superstorm

Summary: The (super) storm we’ve been tracking and warning of for nearly a week is now approaching. Final contingency plans should be rushed to completion. The height of the storm comes tonight, but the first (major) storm surge arrives late morning and midday, starting with the New Jersey coastline. The storm is tracking (very) slight farther south of New York City than models were suggesting yesterday, but our team still expects a major storm surge for Long Island Sound, inundating low-lying areas of Brooklyn and Queens (including some of the runways at JFK and LGA). Lower Manhattan will see substantial flooding at high tide, later this morning, again late evening. Inland rains will create flash flooding capable of shutting down even major highways, but rainfall amounts won’t be quite as severe from New York to Boston. It’s hunker-down time, venturing outside to drive (or shoot video/photos) a fairly bad idea from D.C. to Boston today.
Some level of property damage in high impact areas is inevitable – right now the priority is lowering the risk to staff in the path of Sandy. If team members living within 10 feet of water can’t evacuate inland, or to higher ground, the next best option is a vertical evacuation, riding out the storm in a 3rd or 4th floor building.
Worst Case Scenario Unfolding
If you recall last week, we were talking about the worst case scenario that would unfold if this storm were to make a landfall in the Northeast, more specifically just south of Long Island. As Sandy started to interact and merge with the cold air mass over the Northeast, it intensified even further than previously thought! The 11am update from the National Hurricane center actually had the central pressure of the storm at 943mb (sustained winds of 90mph with higher gusts)… to put that into perspective, the central pressure of “The Perfect Storm” back in 1991 was that of a 972mb low, which actually stayed offshore!
Sandy: Record Setting Superstorm?
The Great Hurricane of Sept. 1938, also known as the “Long Island Express,” had the lowest pressure of an Atlantic Basin storm north of Cape Hatteras, NC at 946 mb. Hurricane Sandy broke that record this morning, dropping to 943 mb! She is forecast to make landfall with a pressure between 944-952 mb, with a tropical storm wind field close to 1000 miles across. As our own Addison Green says, “It’s like flying from NYC to Tampa, FL!”
Other Historical Low Pressure Records
This may also help to put into perspective how strong this storm may be. Note that the lowest pressure ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin was that of Wilma at 882mb in Oct. 2005.
Sandy Landfall PM Monday
The 11AM Monday update from the National Hurricane Center had the storm as a CATEGORY 1 storm just prior to landfall.
I thought this was an incredible map! Take a look at the significant wind field that showed up on previous model runs as Sandy was running ashore. The blue coloring over southern New Jersey would indicate the calm nature of the winds near the “Eye”. Note also the easterly fetch to the winds on the northerly side of the eye, this would indicate a worse case scenario for New York , Long Island and surrounding areas in terms of wind and storm surge.
An Eerie Sight in NYC
How about this… kind of an eerie sight out of NYC as the subways system was shut down on Monday! Thanks to TVNweather.com for the images below.
NYSE Closes for First Time in 11 Years
Here’s another crazy sight from the NYSE, which was closed today for the first time in 11 years!
U.S. stock markets are closed as Hurricane Sandy nears landfall on the East Coast and are likely to remain closed Tuesday. The last time the New York Stock Exchange had an unplanned closing since the terrorist attacks of September 2001. (Oct. 29)”
Expected Power Outages… in the Millions?
An 18th Century Tuesday For Millions of Americans? An engineer at John Hopkins University has predicted power outages, based on Sandy’s characteristics and track. Here is an excerpt of his study: “Using a computer model based on a current forecast as well as data from past hurricanes, an engineer at The Johns Hopkins University predicts that 3 million people in New Jersey will lose power during Hurricane Sandy. Pennsylvania will follow closely behind with 2.5 to 3 million people predicted to lose power, and Maryland with 1.8 million people predicted to lose power. Washington, D.C., and Delaware will have fewer outages, with 200,000 and 400,000 people predicted to lose power, respectively.”
Significant Travel Headaches
WOW! Sandy is having a major impact on air travel across the country and flights inbound and outbound have been cancelled at most of the major hubs out east. According to FlightAware.com there have been more than 12,000 flights cancelled likely due to Sandy.
Significant & Record Setting Rainfall… More to Come
I can’t get over the magnitude of this situation. From heavy winds, storm surge and significant beach erosion to coastal and inland flooding to heavy snows in the Appalachians. It really is hard to keep up with everything that is going on, again due to the magnitude of the situation. That’s why it is so important to follow your local government agencies when it comes to warnings and advisories regarding the weather and or potential emergencies/evacuations. One of the concerns (flooding) has already taken place in many locations along the Eastern Seaboard with more to come. The image below shows the rainfall associated with Sandy since yesterday.
Additional/EXTREME Rainfall
Take a look at NOAA’s HPC 3 day precipitation forecast over the Northeast. Some locations could pick up an additional 6″ to 7″ of precipitation or more, which is cause for concern in terms of significant inland flooding. It’s also interesting to note that some of this extreme precipitation will be falling in the form of snow across the higher elevations of the Appalachians.
Active Flood Headlines
These are all of the active flood headlines across the area as Sandy spreads moisture inland through the next few days. Check your local NWS forecast office for a more specific update on localized hazards due to the extreme rainfall expected.
Active Winter Weather Headlines
These are the winter weather headlines that the National Weather Service has issued for the higher elevations of the Appalachians. Significant snow and high winds could create blizzard like conditions for areas shaded in red.
Snow Forecast
Latest forecasts for snow looks extreme by all measures! There will be 1ft. to 2ft. amounts, but I won’t be surprised to hear reports of 3ft. or more!
Thanks for checking in on this Tuesday, have a great rest of your week!
Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV
RPM Model of Winds at Landfall

Hurricane Sandy: Set to Make Landfall Later Monday and Deliver and Punishing Blow!

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Sandy is still on track to deliver a punishing blow to the Northeast as it makes landfall near southern New Jersey late Monday.

Summary: The (super) storm we’ve been tracking and warning of for nearly a week is now approaching. Final contingency plans should be rushed to completion. The height of the storm comes tonight, but the first (major) storm surge arrives late morning and midday, starting with the New Jersey coastline. The storm is tracking (very) slight farther south of New York City than models were suggesting yesterday, but our team still expects a major storm surge for Long Island Sound, inundating low-lying areas of Brooklyn and Queens (including some of the runways at JFK and LGA). Lower Manhattan will see substantial flooding at high tide, later this morning, again late evening. Inland rains will create flash flooding capable of shutting down even major highways, but rainfall amounts won’t be quite as severe from New York to Boston. It’s hunker-down time, venturing outside to drive (or shoot video/photos) a fairly bad idea from D.C. to Boston today.

Some level of property damage in high impact areas is inevitable – right now the priority is lowering the risk to staff in the path of Sandy. If team members living within 10 feet of water can’t evacuate inland, or to higher ground, the next best option is a vertical evacuation, riding out the storm in a 3rd or 4th floor building.

Worst Case Scenario Unfolding

If you recall last week, we were talking about the worst case scenario that would unfold if this storm were to make a landfall in the Northeast, more specifically just south of Long Island. As Sandy started to interact and merge with the cold air mass over the Northeast, it intensified even further than previously thought! The 11am update from the National Hurricane center actually had the central pressure of the storm at 943mb (sustained winds of 90mph with higher gusts)… to put that into perspective, the central pressure of “The Perfect Storm” back in 1991 was that of a 972mb low, which actually stayed offshore!

Sandy: Record Setting Superstorm?

Thanks to WeatherNation Meteorologist Todd Nelson for the info below:

The Great Hurricane of Sept. 1938, also known as the “Long Island Express,” had the lowest pressure of an Atlantic Basin storm north of Cape Hatteras, NC at 946 mb. Hurricane Sandy broke that record this morning, dropping to 943 mb! She is forecast to make landfall with a pressure between 944-952 mb, with a tropical storm wind field close to 1000 miles across. As our own Addison Green says, “It’s like flying from NYC to Tampa, FL!”

Other Historical Low Pressure Records

This may also help to put into perspective how strong this storm may be. Note that the lowest pressure ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin was that of Wilma at 882mb in Oct. 2005.

Sandy Landfall PM Monday

The 11AM Monday update from the National Hurricane Center had the storm as a CATEGORY 1 storm just prior to landfall.

See the latest updates on Sandy from the NHC HERE:

RPM Model of Winds at Landfall

I thought this was an incredible map! Take a look at the significant wind field that showed up on previous model runs as Sandy was running ashore. The blue coloring over southern New Jersey would indicate the calm nature of the winds near the “Eye”. Note also the easterly fetch to the winds on the northerly side of the eye, this would indicate a worse case scenario for New York , Long Island and surrounding areas in terms of wind and storm surge.

An Eerie Sight in NYC

How about this… kind of an eerie sight out of NYC as the subways system was shut down on Monday! Thanks to TVNweather.com for the images below.

NYSE Closes for First Time in 11 Years

Here’s another crazy sight from the NYSE, which was closed today for the first time in 11 years!

U.S. stock markets are closed as Hurricane Sandy nears landfall on the East Coast and are likely to remain closed Tuesday. The last time the New York Stock Exchange had an unplanned closing since the terrorist attacks of September 2001. (Oct. 29)”

See the full video HERE:

Expected Power Outages… in the Millions?

An 18th Century Tuesday For Millions of Americans? An engineer at John Hopkins University has predicted power outages, based on Sandy’s characteristics and track. Here is an excerpt of his study: “Using a computer model based on a current forecast as well as data from past hurricanes, an engineer at The Johns Hopkins University predicts that 3 million people in New Jersey will lose power during Hurricane Sandy. Pennsylvania will follow closely behind with 2.5 to 3 million people predicted to lose power, and Maryland with 1.8 million people predicted to lose power. Washington, D.C., and Delaware will have fewer outages, with 200,000 and 400,000 people predicted to lose power, respectively.”

Significant Travel Headaches

WOW! Sandy is having a major impact on air travel across the country and flights inbound and outbound have been cancelled at most of the major hubs out east. According to FlightAware.com there have been more than 12,000 flights cancelled likely due to Sandy.

See the latest info HERE:

Significant & Record Setting Rainfall… More to Come

I can’t get over the magnitude of this situation. From heavy winds, storm surge and significant beach erosion to coastal and inland flooding to heavy snows in the Appalachians. It really is hard to keep up with everything that is going on, again due to the magnitude of the situation. That’s why it is so important to follow your local government agencies when it comes to warnings and advisories regarding the weather and or potential emergencies/evacuations. One of the concerns (flooding) has already taken place in many locations along the Eastern Seaboard with more to come. The image below shows the rainfall associated with Sandy since yesterday.

Additional/EXTREME Rainfall

Take a look at NOAA’s HPC 3 day precipitation forecast over the Northeast. Some locations could pick up an additional 6″ to 7″ of precipitation or more, which is cause for concern in terms of significant inland flooding. It’s also interesting to note that some of this extreme precipitation will be falling in the form of snow across the higher elevations of the Appalachians.

Active Flood Headlines

These are all of the active flood headlines across the area as Sandy spreads moisture inland through the next few days. Check your local NWS forecast office for a more specific update on localized hazards due to the extreme rainfall expected.

Active Winter Weather Headlines

These are the winter weather headlines that the National Weather Service has issued for the higher elevations of the Appalachians. Significant snow and high winds could create blizzard like conditions for areas shaded in red.

Snow Forecast

Latest forecasts for snow looks extreme by all measures! There will be 1ft. to 2ft. amounts, but I won’t be surprised to hear reports of 3ft. or more!

Thanks for checking in on this Monday, have a great rest of your week!

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWNTV

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