WeatherNation Blog

Daylight Saving Time… Or Should It Be Called “Daylight Shifting Time?”

Today, enjoy the last fleeting hours of daylight as you know it, for tomorrow, we shall wake up with less available daylight and more time to sleep.  Yup it is that time again, where Daylight Saving Time comes to an end, and we turn the clocks, alarms, watches, and computers (if you don’t have it set automatically) back an hour.

First suggested by Ben Franklin, daylight saving time was instituted in various countries during both World War I and World War II in the 20th century and was made permanent in most of the United States beginning in 1973.  It was meant to provide more daylight at the end of the normal working day during late spring, summer, and early fall. This would enable working longer hours when the sun was still out.  For businesses, it was also preferred.  During the warmer months, having the clocks speed up an hour, meant more folks out after the normal working day, enjoy time in the sun, relaxing at leisure venues and spending money.

Daylight Saving Time hasn’t always been at this time of the month.  Changes were made about 5 years ago…

From: http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/Daylight-Saving-Time-DST

“Daylight Saving Time (DST) is the practice of turning the clock ahead as warmer weather approaches and back as it becomes colder again so that people will have one more hour of daylight in the afternoon and evening during the warmer season of the year. (Some believe that it should be called Daylight Shifting Time because no daylight is actually “saved.” The U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 mandated changes to Daylight Saving Time, extending it three weeks earlier in the spring and one week later in the fall. Starting March 11, 2007 clocks spring ahead an hour on the second Sunday in March and fall back on the first Sunday in November. The assumption behind the change was that it would decrease the need for artificial light sources and, as a result, save energy.”

And not all states participate in Daylight Saving Time…

The light purple shaded area, Arizona, does not observe Daylight Saving Time.  However, the large Navajo Reservation in northeastern Arizona does observe it.

From: http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/Daylight-Saving-Time-DST

“Countries in equatorial and tropical climates do not observe Daylight Saving Time. The months when the clock is set ahead and back differ between northern and southern hemispheres.”

Midwest Snow

A wintery start to the month of November! Snow in North Dakota is definitely not out of the ordinary this time of the year.

Storm totals so far:

NORTH DAKOTA

...GRAND FORKS COUNTY...
  GRAND FORKS                  1.7 M   500 PM 11/02   47.92N  97.07W

...PEMBINA COUNTY...
  12 NW CAVALIER               2.5 M   545 PM 11/02   48.92N  97.81W
  BATHGATE                     2.5 M   600 PM 11/02   48.88N  97.47W
  CAVALIER                     3.0 M   608 PM 11/02   48.80N  97.62W
  ST. THOMAS                   6.0 M   630 PM 11/02   48.62N  97.45W

...RAMSEY COUNTY...
  DEVILS LAKE                  1.5 M   325 PM 11/02   48.11N  98.87W
  STARKWEATHER                 2.7 M   530 PM 11/02   48.45N  98.88W

...STEELE COUNTY...
  HOPE                         2.5 M   545 PM 11/02   47.32N  97.72W

Another Storm Brewing

Long term models suggesting that another winter storm system may be coming.  Note the area of low pressure sitting over Nebraska.  This would bring heavy snow for the Rockies and another round of snow to the Dakotas.

Potential Nor’easter

http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/medr/9lh.gif

Looking out towards the northeast, there is the potential for a strong storm system to move into the area.  The same area that was hit hard by Hurricane Sandy early last week.  It is the “L” located on the eastern seaboard.  This area of low pressure could bring heavy snow, rain, a wintry mix, as well as gusty winds and rough waves to the area.  Depending on how close it comes to the coast, will determine if the coastal areas (the large metro cities included) sees snow, or rain or a wintry mix.  For now, lets go along with the government shows us, as that the low will be off the near the coast.  That means primarily rain will come down from Boston to DC.

A lot change between now and then so we’ll keep you posted!

Enjoy your extra hour of sleep!

Addison Green and Gretchen Mishek

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below:

Post

Calendar